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"Catch Me..." Chair - The ‘Catch Me’ chair reflects people’s desire to lean on the back to legs of a chair. The chair physically changes its shape under the shifting weight of the user, by bending it’s ‘knees’. Once left alone the chair will return to its original shape and awaits the next playful person.
I used series of Sequence photography for understanding the movement and physics, as well as generating a design language.

(for more information see http://www.caroline-noordijk.com)
Inspiration and first scribble =] - The "Catch Me..." chair reflects people's desire to lean on the back to legs of a chair. The chair physically changes its shape under the shifting weight of the user, by bending its "knees". Once left alone the chair will return to its original shape and awaits the next playful person.
I used series of Sequence photography for understanding the movement and physics, as well as generating a design language.

(for more information see http://www.caroline-noordijk.com)
"Catch Me.." Chair, work in progress and detail - I wanted to make a functional prototype without resourcing high-tech materials or high-end engineering. A Chair that looks like a chair, but with a bit of magic! The prototype is made of traditional wood European Ash, renowned for it strength and flexibility, and used in bowmaking. The open laminating technique, in the back legs, acts like a leaf-spring, bending where flexibility is needed. The legs can be build out of more layers, counteracting the weight of its user.
Inspiration - As part of my research for the project I looked different ways of capturing motion and in particularly at chronophotography. Chronophotography (making sequential images) pre-dates cinemaphotography and was used for scientific study of motion in the late 1800's. I was captured by the simplicity of this technique and used it for research and inspiration.
Chronophotography research - As part of my research for the project I looked different ways of capturing motion and in particularly at chronophotography. Chronophotography (making sequential images) pre-dates cinemaphotography and was used for scientific study of motion in the late 1800’s. I was captured by the simplicity of this technique and used it for research and inspiration.
Catch Me Chair
Caroline Noordijk
Designer Look&Feel, Brand Identity specialist Auckland, New Zealand